Feet in 2 Worlds’ News Picks, July 17, 2012

Getting the story. (Photo: State Library and Archives of Florida/Flickr)

Yesterday in our immigration news digest we mentioned Time Magazine’s piece about friction between state and local governments and the Obama Administration over immigration policy.  In a column in the Statesman Journal, Ruben Navarette profiles the mayor of Chicago, former White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel, about his evolving views on immigration and his differences with the Obama administration.

One of the lightning rods in the immigration debate is Joe Arpaio, sheriff of Arizona’s Maricopa County.  But now, as described in this New York Times editorial, Arpaio must explain himself and his aggressive tactics to a federal judge.

Last weekend, Hispanic comedian George Lopez had harsh, salty words for Arpaio during an HBO special.  During a subsequent local news interview, Arpaio challenged Lopez to meet with him.

Counterpunch published a rundown on the Supreme Court decision about Arizona’s SB 1070.

Even before President Obama’s much-publicized changes to federal immigration policy, there was an existing federal policy of “prosecutorial discretion,” which was supposed to clear the enormous backlog of immigration cases.  According to Cronkite News, that has not been the case, as only 1.5 percent of outstanding cases have been closed.

At the Huffington Post, Eliseo Medina and Bill Burton discuss the shortcomings of Mitt Romney’s Spanish-language outreach to Latino voters.

In New York news, Grace Meng hopes to become the first Asian-American to represent the state in Congress.  But before she can do that, she needs to get past City Councilman Dan Halloran, who challenged her to five televised debates.  DNAInfo.com has the story.

In El Diario/La Prensa, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand speaks to the immigrant community and calls on President Barack Obama to make further use of his executive power to help with immigration issues.

Finally, the Irish Echo has the story of Anastasia Somoza, a child of immigrants now headed to the London School of Economics.

Fi2W is supported by the New York Community Trust and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation with additional support from the Ralph E. Odgen Foundation and the Sirus Fund. 

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