Feet in 2 Worlds’ News Picks, July 18, 2012

If the story’s out there, we’ll get it. (Photo: tenioman/Flickr)

The Supreme Court may have ruled on SB 1070 and struck down three of its four major provisions, but the law’s requirement that local authorities check the immigration status of anyone whom they suspect of being in the country illegally still stands.

According to the Associated Press, the legal push against this final provision has just started.

Congressman Steve King of Iowa also told the Daily Caller that a lawsuit may be coming soon in response to President Obama’s new immigration policy.

As we reported, Governor Rick Scott of Florida received permission from the federal government to access a Department of Homeland Security (DHS) database of non-citizen residents.  Scott comments on the development here.

For more details on Scott’s popularity and the level of public support for his voting initiative, check out this Tampa Bay Times poll.

Joe Arpaio, the controversial sheriff of Maricopa County in Arizona, is facing a civil rights trial over his anti-illegal immigration tactics.  The Arizona Republic weighs in on why this is important here.  (In related news, Arpaio announced that his team of “volunteer investigators” have found President Obama’s birth certificate to be fake).

In New York news, the race between Charles Rangel and Adriano Espaillat may have ended in defeat for the Dominican immigrant community, but the Board of Elections has decided to change the way it tallies votes on election night, according to DNAInfo.com.  We covered the problems that led to this decision at Fi2W.

In Brooklyn, Congressman Michael Grimm declared his support for practitioners of Falun Gong, a religion founded in China and the subject of persecution by the Chinese government.

Finally, the FilAm previews an upcoming performance by a Filipino hairdresser about what it means to be Filipino in America.

Fi2W is supported by the New York Community Trust and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation with additional support from the Ralph E. Odgen Foundation and the Sirus Fund. 

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